Curatron PEMF supplies Multiple Sclerosis relief

Multiple Sclerosis and PEMF

By Jonathan Bowen,
March 31, 2015

Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. The protective sheath that covers the nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves are damaged, inflamed and hardened.

PEMF heals the Myelin Sheath

The nerve cells, called neurons, transfer electrical signals from the brain throughout the body. In MS sufferers, the Myelin sheath, which insulates the nerves, is eroded by mistaken attacks form immune cells and the nerve fiber is damaged, leading to a breakdown in the ability of the nerve cells to transmit signals.

The result in the damage to the Myelin sheath produces a wide range of physical and mental symptoms. If the damage to the Myelin is minimal, nerve signals proceed with minor interruptions; however if the damage is more substantial and scar tissue replaces the Myelin, the nerve signals can be entirely compromised.

Symptoms of MSPEMF Mulptiple Sclerosis Symptoms

MS can come in waves, with the symptoms disappearing between flare-ups. It can build up over time and cause permanent neurological problems.

According to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, symptoms of MS include “extreme fatigue, lack of coordination, weakness, tingling, impaired sensation, vision problems, bladder problems, cognitive impairment and mood changes.” Other sources list symptoms such as bowel problems, (including incontinence, diarrhea or constipation), muscle spasms, speech issues, difficulties thinking, depression, and high temperatures.

Susceptibility.

While the exact cause is not known, the disease is believed to occur because of environmental factors and genetics. Viruses appear to trigger MS. Women are twice as likely to develop MS over men. The disease usually occurs between the ages of twenty and fifty.

Interestingly, Alonso Hernán documented that MS is more common in people who live farther from the equator in the publication “Temporal trends in the incidence of multiple sclerosis: a systematic review”, (July 2008, Neurology 71 (2): 129–35.). The decrease in the magnetic field of the earth is experienced the most in the Northern Hemisphere.

Traditional Pharmacological Treatment.

Medication has only a mild effect on MS and can cause many adverse side effects and reactions. Most treatment is geared toward returning the patient to normal function after a flare-up of MS. Some medications include corticosteroids which are taken orally and intravenously. They do not provide a permenant cure, and have side effects such as anxiety, depression, sodium retention, hypertension, muscle wasting, hyperglycemia, diabetes, colitis, Chron’s disease, peptic ulceration, and others.

PEMF an effective treatment of MS

PEMF enhances Neruon MyelinScientific studies have demonstrated that PEMF can have a significant role in treating MS. PEMF is effective on multiple levels, first it will help repair damage caused to the Myelin sheath, second it will help with neuroplasticity in reprogramming damaged areas of the brain (see Neuroplasticity in the Parkinson’s article).

Scientific studies show that PEMF is “capable of initiating various healing processes including…. multiple sclerosis.” Generally speaking, the reports indicated “PEMF has also demonstrated “improvements in a variety of areas, including fatigue, sleep, vision, bladder function, movement and speech problems, and mood.” Studies revealed, PEMF is “effective treatment in reducing symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis, with the most positive improvements involving the alleviation of spasticity and pain.”

Studies also indicated patients with “continuous and debilitating daily fatigue” and treated with PEMF saw “dramatically improved symptoms of fatigue.

Treatment is effective for issues with eyesight: “Positive findings have also been shown with respect to multiple sclerosis and degenerative diseases of the retina;” also, patients “experienced improvements in visuospatial and visuomotor functions.”

Studies indicated, “patients experienced significant improvements in cognitive functions.” These cognitive functions included problems understanding words (Alexia), as patients experienced a “reversal of the alexia following the start of electromagnetic field treatment.”

Speech problems were also dramatically affected, “Symptoms were completely resolved following 3-4 weeks of treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields.” Not only this, “patients with poor word fluency who experienced a 100-percent increase in word output following 4-5 sessions of treatment.”

Many symptoms were relieved with PEMF treatment, where patients experienced a “a range of improvements, including improvements in gait, balance, bowel and bladder functions, vision, mood, and sleep.” A “reduction in tremors” was also experienced.

Curatron has the ability to penetrate into the skull and nervous system without invoking involuntary muscle spasms. It provides a relaxing treatment for MS without side effects.

 


 Scientific Excerpts

“Electromagnetic fields (EMF) are capable of initiating various healing processes including delayed fractures, pain relief, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease.” (Rosch and Markov 2004).

“Noting that this modality has been used for more than a decade, the author states that magnetotherapy has been shown to be effective in treating rheumatic diseases, sinusitis, enuresis, and ischemic disorders of the lower extremities. Positive findings have also been shown with respect to multiple sclerosis and degenerative diseases of the retina.” (J. Jerabek, "Pulsed Magnetotherapy in Czechoslovakia--A Review," Rev Environ Health, 10(2), April-June 1994, . 127-134.)

This article reports on the case of a 55-year-old female chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patient who received a single external application of magnetic fields which lasted 20 minutes. The treatment quickly led to improvements in a variety of areas, including fatigue, sleep, vision, bladder function, movement and speech problems, and mood. (R. Sandyk, "Rapid Normalization of Visual Evoked Potentials picoTesla Range Magnetic Fields in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 77(3-4), August 1994, p. 243-259.)

This study reports on four cases of multiple sclerosis who experienced improvements in visuospatial and visuomotor functions following treatment with external application of low magnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, "Further Observations on the Effects of External picoTesla Range MagneticFields on Visual Memory and Visuospatial Functions in Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosc, 77(3-4), August 1994, 203-27)

This article reports on the case of a 50-year-old female chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patient who received a single external application of magnetic fields who experienced significant improvements following the treatment. (R. Sandyk, "Successful Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis with Magnetic Fields," International Journal Neurosci, 66(3-4), October 1992, p. 237-250. )

This article reports on the cases of three patients suffering from long-time symptoms of multiple sclerosis who received treatment with extra cerebral pulsed electromagnetic fields over a period of between 6 and 18 months. Results showed all three patients experienced significant improvements in cognitive functions. (R. Sandyk, "Progressive Cognitive Improvement in Multiple Sclerosis from Treatment with Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 89(1-2), January 1997, p. 39-51.)

This is a report on the cases of two chronic multiple sclerosis patients exhibiting severe speech problems. Symptoms were completely resolved following 3-4 weeks of treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, "Resolution of Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 83(1-2), November 1995, p. 81-92.)

This article reports on the cases of three multiple sclerosis patients suffering from alexia (lack of understanding of written words) who experienced a reversal of the alexia following the start of electromagnetic field treatment. (R. Sandyk, "Reversal of Alexia in Multiple Sclerosis Weak Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 83(1-2), November 1995, p. 69-79.)

This article reports on the case of a middle-aged disabled female patient with a 19-year history of chronic relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Within one day of receiving experimental treatment with electromagnetic fields, the patient exhibited improvements in her condition. The patient continued with 1-2 treatments per week over a period of 32 months. During this time, significant improvements were seen with respect to a range of physical symptoms, as well as cognitive functions. (R. Sandyk, "Long Term Beneficial Effects of Weak Electromagnetic Fields in Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 83(1-2), November 1995, p. 45-57.)

The cases of three female multiple sclerosis patients exhibiting suicidal behavior are discussed in this article. Treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields resolved the suicidal behavior in all three patients, an improvement that was maintained over a follow-up period of 3.5 years. (R. Sandyk, "Suicidal Behavior is Attenuated in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Treatment with Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 87(1-2), October 1996, p. 5-15.)

This article reports on the case of a 36-year-old man severely disabled with partial paralysis and lack of coordination. Three treatment sessions per week with pulsed electromagnetic fields over a period of one year led to a range of improvements, including improvements in gait, balance, bowel and bladder functions, vision, mood, and sleep. No progression of symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis was seen throughout the course of EMF treatment. (R. Sandyk, "Treatment with Electromagnetic Field Alters the Clinical Course of Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis--A Case Report," International Journal of Neurosci, 88(1-2), November 1996, p. 75-82.)

This article reports on the cases of two multiple sclerosis patients suffering from chronic ataxia who performed poorly on human figure drawing tests administered to measure body image perception. Treatment with extracerebral applications of flux electromagnetic fields led to improvements in gait and balance as well as a normalization in body image perception as seen on a repeat of the same test each patient. (R. Sandyk, "Effect of Weak Electromagnetic Fields on Body Image Perception in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis, " International Journal of Neurosci, 86(1-2), July 1996, p. 79-85.)

This article reports on the case of a 51-year-old female patient with remitting-progressive multiple sclerosis who experienced a successful reduction in carbohydrate craving believed to be associated with the exacerbation of her condition following treatment with a series of extra cranial AC pulsed applications of flux intensity electromagnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, "Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields Attenuates Carbohydrate Craving in a Patients with Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 86(1-2), July 1996, p. 67-77.)

This article reports on the cases of three multiple sclerosis patients suffering from a chronic progressive course of the disease who experienced a reduction in tremors following treatment with brief external applications of pulsed EMFs. (R. Sandyk & L.C. Dann, "Weak Electromagnetic Fields Attenuate Tremor in Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 79(3-4), December 1994, p. 199-212.)

This article reports on the cases of three female chronic multiple sclerosis patients who experienced a reversal of cognitive deficits following treatment with brief external applications of alternating pulsed electromagnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, Reversal of Visuospatial Hemi-inattention in Patients with Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 79(3-4), December 1994, p. 169-184.)

This article reports on the cases of three female multiple sclerosis patients with poor word fluency who experienced a 100-percent increase in word output following 4-5 sessions of treatment with electromagnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, Improvement in Word-fluency Performance in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Electromagnetic Fields," International Journal Neurosci, 79(1-2), November 1994, p.75-90.)

This article reports on the case of a 58-year-old male multiple sclerosis patient with a 37-year history of the disease. Treatment with external application of magnetic fields led to a speedy improvement of neurological symptoms in the areas of walking, balance, sensory symptoms, and bladder function. Improvements in numerous cognitive functions were seen within 24 hours of treatment as well. (R. Sandyk & R.P. Iacono, "Improvement PicoTesla Range Magnetic Fields of Perceptual-motor Performance and Visual Memory in a Patient with Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 78(1-2), September 1994, p. 53-66.)

This article reports on the case of a 36-year-old multiple sclerosis patient who experienced immediate improvements in visuoperceptive functions following treatment with external application of magnetic fields. (R. Sandyk & R.P. Iacono, "Multiple Sclerosis: Improvement of Visuoperceptive Functions PicoTesla Range Magnetic Fields," International Journal of Neurosci, 74(1-4), January-February 1994, p. 177-189.)

This article reports on the cases of three multiple sclerosis patients suffering from falls due to rapid deterioration in balance and triggered distracting external auditory stimuli. Treatment with a series of extra cranially applied, low-frequency electromagnetic fields quickly resolved such symptoms associated with a loss of balance. (R. Sandyk, "Application of Weak Electromagnetic Fields Facilitates Sensory-motor Integration in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis," International Journal of Neurosci, 85(1-2), March 1996, p. 101-110.)

This article reports on the cases of three multiple sclerosis patients experiencing continuous and debilitating daily fatigue over the course of several years. Treatment with extracranially applied flux electromagnetic fields dramatically improved symptoms of fatigue in all three patients. (R. Sandyk, Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields Improves Fatigue Associated with Multiple Sclerosis, International Journal of Neurosci, 84(1-4), February 1996, p. 177-186.)

This article reports on the cases of two female patients with chronic progressive-stage multiple sclerosis who suffered from regular worsening of their symptoms starting approximately a week prior to menstruation and abating at menstruation onset. Such symptoms were resolved in both patients two months following the start of treatment with the extracranial application of electromagnetic fields. (R. Sandyk, Premenstrual Exacerbation of Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis is Attenuated Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields, International Journal of Neurosci, 83(3-4), December 1995, p. 187-198.)

This article reports on the case of a 64-year-old female patient with a 22-year history of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Two 30-minute treatments with low-level electromagnetic fields produced a marked improvement in a variety of symptoms. (R. Sandyk R.P. Iacono, Resolution of Longstanding Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis Application of PicoTesla Range Magnetic Fields, International Journal of Neurosci, 70(3-4), June 1993, p. 255-269.)

Results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that pulsed electromagnetic fields administered daily over a period of 15 days proved to be an effective treatment in reducing spasticity and incontinence associated with multiple sclerosis. (A. Guseo, Double-Blind Treatments with Pulsating Electromagnetic Field in Multiple Sclerosis, Hungarian Symposium on Magnetotherapy, 2nd Symposium, May 16-17, 1987, Szekesfehervar, Hungary, p. 85-89.)

Results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study indicated that pulsed electromagnetic fields administered daily over a period of 15 days is a generally effective treatment in reducing symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis, with the most positive improvements involving the alleviation of spasticity and pain. (A. Guseo, Pulsing Electromagnetic Field Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis the Gyuling- Bordacs Device: Double-Blind, Cross-Over and Open Studies, Journal of Bioelectr., 6(1), 1987, p. 23-35.)

Results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study indicated that exposure to magnetic fields produced beneficial clinical effects in patients suffering from cerebral paralysis and in patients with multiple sclerosis. (A. Sieron, The Variable Magnetic Fields in the Complex Treatment of Neurological Diseases, European Bioelectromagnetics Association, 3rd International Congress, 29 February - 3 March 1996, Nancy, France.)